ten mov.es

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how to do technology in ten moves. (or less.) A Loose Wire production

How to Browse Securely

(Windows only)

Most bad stuff lands on your computer through the browser. Visit a dodgy site and this stuff will try to drop files onto your computer. Because most of us using Windows do so under administrator rights—so we can install programs etc—this can be done without much difficulty. Here’s how to avoid this weak link in the Windows chain, by ensuring that when you use your browser you do so without doing so as an administrator.

1.

Download RemoveAdmin from Download.com.

2.

Launch the installer.

3.

Once it’s installed you’ll find a shortcut on your desktop like this:

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If you’re using Internet Explorer double click that shortcut every time you launch the browser. (Skip to Step 10 to confirm you’re browsing securely.)

4.

If you’re using Firefox, for some reason the installer won’t prepare a shortcut for you so you’ll have to do it manually.

Select and copy this text to the clipboard:

"C:\Program Files\RemoveAdmin\removeAdmin.exe"

(including the quotes)

5.

Find your Firefox browser shortcut and right click, selecting Properties:

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6.

Click the mouse in the Target field and go to the beginning of the line (hitting Home should do it).

7.

Paste the copied text to the beginning of the line. The full line should read something like this:

"C:\Program Files\RemoveAdmin\removeAdmin.exe" "C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox 3 Beta 5\firefox.exe"

(You may have to move the cursor along the line because the box is too small for all the text to be visible:)

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8.

One more step: You need to change the startup directory. Copy the text below to the clipboard and paste it into the Start in: box below the Target: box:

"C:\Program Files\RemoveAdmin"

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9.

Click on OK.

10.

To test you’re browsing securely, visit any website, right click and select View page source:

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From the resulting window, try saving to your Windows directory (File/Save as and then navigate to C:\Windows.)

If you’re browsing securely you should see this message:

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(Thanks to betelgeuse68, a commenter at ZDNet, for the idea and the link.)

Filed under: medium, , , ,

How to Export Google Earth Places

If you move computer and want to export your My Places, or want to save your My Places and access them elsewhere, here are some ways to do it.

Saving your My Places file to another computer

If you are still using the old computer, load Google Earth and right click on the My Places icon. Choose the Save Place As option from the pop-up menu:

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Select the KMZ file (it’s smaller: a KMZ is a compressed version of a KML file and these files can get quite big):

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Save it to somewhere you can find it again.

Sending your Google Earth My Places via email

Another option is to send it via email.

Select the My Places folder in the left hand pane:

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Click on the email icon at the top of the main window:

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And follow the instructions:

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Finding and saving the file on another drive

If you’re not using the computer you want to save your My Places from, then you’ll have to find the kml file first.

The file is stored in the folder C:\Documents and Settings\<username>\Application Data\Google\GoogleEarth and is called myplaces.kml.

So you can either dig down to that folder or search for the file itself.

Once you’ve found it, save it to the place you want to keep it.

Importing the My Places file into Google Earth

This is pretty straightforward: Once you’ve opened Google Earth, just click on the File/Open menu:

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and open the myplaces.kml or myplaces.kmz file.

GoogleEarth will insert the MyPlaces folder at the bottom of any existing places in the Temporary Folders in your Places pane

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You’ll need to move those places you want to save at the end of the session or they’ll be deleted.

Filed under: medium, , , , , , ,

How to Quickly Add Notes to Evernote

Evernote is a great tool for collecting stuff, but it’s also useful place to dump ideas and write quick notes to yourself. But there’s no easy way to do the latter. Here’s the best approach I can find, which involves using a tool I already use: Launchy.

1.

You need to install the excellent desktop tool Launchy first. (Launchy is a great tool for quickly loading programs, websites or files.)

2.

Find and copy the email address that Evernote provides for you to email stuff to your account. It’s probably in the settings page, towards the bottom right hand side:

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(It’s usually your username, a period, then some digits, followed by @m.evernote.com)

3.

Pull up Launch (usually Alt and F12) and open the options window in Launchy (right click on the window and select options):

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4.

Go to the Plugins tab and click on Weby:

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5.

In the list on the right, click on the + button at the bottom:

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6.

In the Name field in your new entry, type in the word that you want to use to add an Evernote entry (I use idea but it could be anything). In the next field type in mailto: and then paste your Evernote email address. If you want to include a default title for your note—say, idea–add ?subject=idea immediately after the email address. Like this:

mailto:xxxxxxxx.87234@m.evernote.com?subject=Idea

7.

Click on OK.

8.

Bring up the Launchy window again, type in the word you chose to activate the function, and hit enter.

9.

Your default email program should now load a fresh email with the Evernote address in, the title you’ve assigned in the Subject field, and the cursor in in the body.

10.

Type your note and then send it. It should appear in the web version of Evernote and, when next you sync with your offline Evernote program, appear there too.

I’m sure there’s an easier way to do this, but I find it works, especially with something relatively light like Thunderbird.

Filed under: medium

How To Quickly Add Events to Google Calendar

Here’s a quick way to add events to Google Calendar without even opening your browser.

(This works with Windows and Linux. There might be a way to do it on a Mac but I don’t know it.)

1.

You need to install the excellent desktop tool Launchy first. (Launchy is a great tool for quickly loading programs, websites or files.)

2.

Download the Google Calendar Plugin 2.0 from David Karlsson. Details here, or download the ZIP file here.

3.

Unzip the file into your Launchy directory—usually C:\Program Files\Launchy. (Unpacking it there will automatically dump the dll file into your plugin directory.)

4.

Close Launchy if it’s running, and then open it again.

5.

Pull up Launch (usually Alt and F12) and open the options window in Launchy (right click on the window and select options):

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6.

Go to the Plugins tab and click on gCal:

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7.

Fill in your Google account and password:

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8.

Back in Launchy, type in gcal and hit Tab. You should see the icon below appear, and a small arrow after gCal:

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9.

Enter the event you want to add: You can use the same syntax as Google Calendar uses. For example, Party down 11 pm at Joes:

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will come out as

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10.

If you have more than one calendar, hit Tab again after the event and enter the calendar name:

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Which will insert it in the correct calendar.

That’s it. A great little plugin, and many thanks to David Karlsson for his work.

Filed under: medium

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